Nestle scales Nepresso delivery with MuleSource

Open source delivers cost and flexibility benefits, as Nespresso found after enlisting MuleSource and Optaros to help it define and implement a new middleware architecture.

Nestle's Nespresso division, a Switzerland-based global leader in coffee, with more than 1,700 employees and sales into 50 countries, had the kind of problem most companies would love to have: growth. As its traditional retail channels moved online, it found it difficult to scale its systems to be able to manage its online growth.

Enter MuleSource, with its open-source Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) technology, Mule. In conjunction with a leading open-source system integrator, Optaros, the two put together a highly scalable services-oriented architecture for Nespresso that makes the coffee drip on time:

Nespresso engaged Optaros and MuleSource to help its corporate architecture team define and implement a new middleware architecture called Nespresso Open Architecture, or NesOA. This new modern architecture is based on service-oriented architecture (SOA) principles, including fully decoupled systems that support both synchronous and asynchronous integration.

With these capabilities, Nespresso's IT infrastructure can now enable new distribution channels, improve business agility, cope with increased transaction volumes, and more easily introduce new applications and services, as needed.

Sounds great, but it's especially telling that the initial implementation took only six months, a testament to the lightweight, open approach that open-source projects like Mule offer enterprises.

But open source isn't just a short-term time saver. In fact, its biggest benefits may come from increased flexibility down the road, as Nespresso's Joel Schmitt, an enterprise architect, declares in a case study describing Nespresso's deployment:

We are committed to an open-source approach, including MuleSource's Mule ESB, because complying with open standards is key for future extensibility and growth...With our new architecture, we have been able to add flexibility and agility to our system landscape.

In this case, Optaros and MuleSource delivered cost and flexibility benefits, but the same types of benefits are being discovered for a wide variety of applications by enterprise IT.


Disclosure: I am an adviser to MuleSource, and my employer, Alfresco, partners with Optaros. I do not, however, drink coffee, so theoretically, I'm biased against Nespresso. :-)

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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