NASA scientist: Fossils of alien life on meteorite

Dr. Richard B. Hoover, an astrobiologist with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, claims there's fossil evidence of bacterial life on meteorite he studied.

Living in the Bay Area, one often wonders where certain beings really came from.

And it seems that the pressure for authorities to admit that everything down here isn't exactly human increases every day.

Now an astrobiologist with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Dr. Richard B. Hoover, has added to the excitement.

Hoover has spent considerable years traveling to remote places like Alaska and Siberia. There, he's collected meteorites, which he's taken back to his lab and examined.

He published his conclusions yesterday in the Journal of Cosmology, and one can only describe his findings as very, very interesting.

His conclusions came out of deep examination of CI1 carbonaceous chondrites--meteorites that you don't come across terribly often. Apparently, there are only nine of them on earth.

However, once he pored into their contents, Hoover concluded there was fossil evidence of bacterial life. Given that the meterorites came from somewhere out there and not down here, he believes that somewhere out there, there is (or was) a life form.

Will we ever know what they look like or who they are? CC Mcdlttx/Flickr

Indeed, his simple examination, using a scanning-electron microscope and a field emission electron-scanning microscope, told him that some of the fossil life was not all that different from the micro-organisms found on earth.

He explained to FoxNews.com: "I interpret it as indicating that life is more broadly distributed than restricted strictly to the planet earth."

Perhaps this is pulsating enough. But, for me, the true joy resides in the fact that, according to Hoover, certain of the fossilized elements weren't similar to earth life at all.

Hoover told FoxNews.com: "There are some that are just very strange and don't look like anything that I've been able to identify, and I've shown them to many other experts that have also come up stumped."

Naturally, there will be skeptics. There will be those who will want to examine for themselves every last piece of evidence. There will be those who will want to present all kinds of hypotheses to cast nets of doubt on Hoover's conclusions.

In fact, another NASA scientist has already expressed caution, telling FoxNews that claims like Hoover's have been made before and found to be mistaken. And the Journal of Cosmology itself has invited the scientific community to "write critical commentaries or to speculate about the implications" of Hoover's findings; it plans to begin publishing those responses come Monday.

Still, when a former Canadian defense minister , several U.S. Air Force pilots and even Stephen Hawking all insist that alien life is out there, perhaps this research will be one more stone cast at the naysayers.

Of course, the greatest fear still lies in the unknown. While the former Canadian defense minister, Paul Hellyer, and the U.S. pilots believe aliens are friendly beings who merely want us to mend our wanton ways, Hawking is a hawk.

He declared that aliens might truly dislike us. (Not hard, I know.)

And so our world hurtles one step closer to the potential for radical change. If only one of the alien life forms would reveal itself to us, then we all might breathe a sigh of relief and redirect our energies to a better life.

My guess, by the way, is that Charlie Sheen is not an alien life form. But there must be someone from out there already here. Jimmy Fallon? Peyton Manning? Dan Rather? I just don't know.

 

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