My dot-matrix-camouflaged Mighty Wallet: Just don't throw it out if you find it

My temporary wallet looks like spare printout paper from the 80s, and I like it that way.

Mighty Wallet: disguised as mere Pi-encrusted printout paper.
Mighty Wallet: disguised as mere Pi-encrusted printout paper. Scott Stein/CNET

Pulling my dot-matrix Mighty Wallet out of my pocket, I might look like I'm living life with dollar bills stuck into an old piece of '80s printer paper. I like that. I just hope no one throws it out.

Searching for a backup wallet to replace one from a vacation I just took, I wandered down to Urban Outfitters and found this enticingly ridiculous, and ugly, dot-matrix wallet. It's a design only a geek could love. The green-and-white paper complete with tractor holes looks picture-perfect, only this wallet's not made of standard paper. Mighty Wallets are made of Tyvek, that same tear- and water-resistant material that's used in mailing envelopes and water-park wristbands. They've been around since 2005, but this is the first time I'd ever seen one.

Scott Stein/CNET

The $15 wallet has two bill pockets, and two inner credit-card pouches. Dynomighty Design, based in Brooklyn, also proudly boasts that these wallets are recyclable. Those numbers on the wallet? They're the first 2,940 digits of Pi.

After a few days, mine is already weathering into a rather realistic ugly state, but Dynomighty promises that the wear won't affect the wallet's integrity over time. I hope I get some decent use of it, but at least in the meantime I feel like pulling this out on city streets late at night at least won't get me mugged. On the other hand, I've got to make sure no one accidentally throws it away if they find it on the floor (my wife has seen it on our kitchen table and says she's already twice nearly thrown it out).

They're available online in a variety of other novelty designs. Hey, at least it's thin.

About the author

Scott Stein is a senior editor covering iOS and laptop reviews, mobile computing, video games, and tech culture. He has previously written for both mainstream and technology enthusiast publications including Wired, Esquire.com, Men's Journal, and Maxim, and regularly appears on TV and radio talking tech trends.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Up for a challenge?

Put yourself to the real tech test by building your own virtual-reality headset with a few household items.