Muse brainwave-reading headband: Mind control for all

Your own personal "Minority Report" is a little closer to reality, thanks to the Muse brainwave-sensing headband.

Muse headband
This is way cooler than the headbands everybody wore in the '80s. Interaxon

As a child, I used to concentrate really hard on things like pencils and pebbles, trying to get them to budge with the sheer power of my mind. It never worked, but technology is getting us a little closer to the mind control dream. The Muse brainwave-sensing headband from Interaxon is a step in the right direction.

The Muse uses two sensors on the forehead and two behind the ears. You wear it positioned kind of like a pair of glasses. It measures your brainwaves and sends the information to a smartphone or tablet. Viewing that data in real time can show you if your mind is wandering, if you're relaxed, or if you're in a state of intense concentration.

The Muse has the potential to give you a window into your mind and mental state. Interaxon sees people using it to develop their concentration skills, learn to keep their cools better, and practice relaxation techniques.

Interaxon is currently raising funds for the Muse on Indiegogo. You can get in on the early "Minority Report" action for a $165 pledge. The gadget comes with a brain fitness app stocked with a series of guided lessons designed to help exercise your memory, attention span, and relaxation skills.

The uses for a device like the Muse in the future are even more intriguing. We're heading into some pretty cool science fiction territory, where you could play games and control hardware devices around you. I, for one, can't wait to cook a cheese sandwich using only my mind and a George Foreman Thought-Control Grill.

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