Mt. Gox consults with cops on the case of the missing bitcoins

The embattled bitcoin exchange says it’s consulted with the metropolitan police department over the disappearance of 650,000 bitcoins.

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CNET

Bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox is now working with local police in Japan to find out what happened to all those missing bitcoins.

In a newly-posted document on the Mt. Gox Web site, CEO Mark Karpeles revealed that the company has "consulted with the metropolitan police department with regard to the disappearance of bitcoins." Mt. Gox has submitted all the necessary documents related to the matter, Karpeles said, adding that the company intends to cooperate with the authorities.

Mt. Gox filed for bankruptcy protection last month as Karpeles revealed that it lost almost 750,000 customer bitcoins, as well as 100,000 of the exchange's own bitcoins. Last week, Karpeles announced that 200,000 of those missing bitcoins were discovered in an unused "wallet," leaving the total number of those still missing at 650,000 (around $383 million at current exchange rates).

Karpeles has maintained that the bitcoins were stolen by hackers through a security flaw in Mt. Gox's exchange system. But hackers who broke into Mt. Gox claimed earlier this month that the exchange's servers show a disparity in the number of bitcoins deposited and the number reported stolen.

Mt. Gox's latest statement appears on its Web site as follows:


"Announcement with regard to consultations with investigating authorities on the disappearance of bitcoins.

"Following its application for commencement of civil rehabilitation, MtGox Co., Ltd. consulted with the metropolitan police department with regard to the disappearance of bitcoins which is one of the causes for said application. MtGox Co., Ltd. hereby announces that it has submitted necessary electronic records and other related documents.

"MtGoxCo., Ltd. Intends to fully cooperate with each competent authority.

"Further, MtGox Co.,Ltd. continues to make efforts to clarify facts as quickly as possible and to recover from damages."


About the author

Journalist, software trainer, and Web developer Lance Whitney writes columns and reviews for CNET, Computer Shopper, Microsoft TechNet, and other technology sites. His first book, "Windows 8 Five Minutes at a Time," was published by Wiley & Sons in November 2012.

 

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