More ways to lift a laptop

Readers suggest some of their favorite laptop stands.

Once you choose a laptop as your primary computer, you're likely to invest a fair amount of time figuring out your ideal setup for working at your desk. So after I published a roundup of our favorite laptop stands, I wasn't surprised that a number of readers wrote in with their own preferred methods for lifting their laptops.

iLap Laptop Stand
Rain Design

First, Ryan wrote in to endorse the iLap from Rain Design (shown at left). "It has worked great with all my laptops for years," he said. He went on to explain that he liked the product's versatility: a removable padded front cushion lets you use the stand on your lap as well as on a desk.

Reader W.T. offered a low-tech (and cheap) solution: cutting boards, especially those with nonskid silicone accents. He attributes the cutting board with keeping his laptop vents clear and away from debris, and likes that they work on tabletops, pillows, or his lap. Because heat is an issue, W.T. urges you to use only cutting boards that are rated dishwasher-safe by the NSF. "I haven't figured out the IT uses for rolling pins as of yet," he adds.

Fingers laptop stand
Oof Design

And finally, reader Todd sent me a link to a post on the Sci Fi Tech blog that describes the Fingers laptop stand, a clear acrylic riser with teeth--or, um, fingers--along the back to hold your cables and cords in place when you go roaming with your laptop. The product is available from Oof Design for about $30 plus shipping.

Thanks to everyone who wrote in, and if you know of an uplifting laptop accessory, let me know in the comments.

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