More RIM employees speak out

After yesterday's anonymous letter from a RIM executive bemoaning the company's woes, more employees hoping for change at the company post unsigned letters.

The anonymous open letter to Research In Motion management posted online yesterday has apparently brought more employees out of the woodwork.

Today, BGR, the site that posted the original letter from a RIM executive, has two more anonymous letters from RIM folks that it says it has picked out from "dozens" that came in yesterday. Only two were posted today, but BGR says there are more that it may post in the coming weeks.

One letter is from a former employee in the legal department, the other from someone in the BlackBerry services department.

The first said yesterday's anonymous letter "brilliantly articulated just about everything I've thought and/or heard relating to the company in the last two years."

The writer no longer works at RIM, but claimed to still love the company and its products. He or she said they want to see RIM open its eyes to the reality the company is facing and not rely on past successes: "Success cannot be borne of a 2005 status quo when the world looks a lot different now than it did even 12 months ago."

The second writer today had many of the same complaints as yesterday's author: RIM's poor leadership, low morale, too many projects, and an overabundance of red tape. The author stressed that RIM had many talented people working there, but they are hamstrung by bureaucratic processes. "It can take weeks of time to make small changes, and months to make major ones. "

RIM hasn't yet responded to this batch of letters. The company did post a blog yesterday in response to the original unsigned letter. But the company's response didn't really answer anything. It said that while the company had faced many challenges, it was nearly past those, and that its financial picture being very healthy, should convince everyone that everything is well within RIM.

Alas, sagging smartphone market share , delayed products, layoffs , and disgruntled employees haven't done much to back up the company's argument.

 

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