More noise about Mac OS in redesigned iPods

It's been awhile since the last iPod revamp, and signs are building that we're looking down the barrel at new, more sophisticated models, perhaps as early as September.

The iPhone has launched, and the iMac has been redesigned, which means it's probably time for new iPods.

Several different reports have surfaced over the past couple of days regarding revamped iPods that Apple may or may not have in the works. Other than adding color to the iPod Shuffle line, Apple hasn't done anything with the traditional iPods this year, and it looks like that's about to change.

It's starting to look like the iPod Nano is set for an overhaul. Apple

AppleInsider believes that Apple will release Mac OS X-based iPods in September, citing unidentified sources. This particular theory has surfaced before, with many believing that Apple will introduce an iPod that looks just like the iPhone , just without the ability to make phone calls.

These new iPods would have features very similiar to the iPhone but would retain the familiar click-wheel interface, according to AppleInsider. The site thinks four models are planned, two new iPod Nano models and two new iPod models, all of which would run some iteration of Mac OS.

It seems to make sense to me that Apple would want to start releasing Mac OS X iPods, given the amount of work it put into tailoring Mac OS for the iPhone and the extras that could possibly come along with Leopard in October. Also, a phone-less iPhone would finally give Apple a real video iPod, with the wider screen and the ability to watch movies or TV in landscape mode.

The exact details may still be up in the air, and the only safe bet seems to be that Apple will release new iPods later this year to refresh an aging lineup in time for the holiday season. Apple sold 21 million iPods in the fourth quarter of last year without making any major changes, and new designs could prompt upgrades.

About the author

    Tom Krazit writes about the ever-expanding world of Google, as the most prominent company on the Internet defends its search juggernaut while expanding into nearly anything it thinks possible. He has previously written about Apple, the traditional PC industry, and chip companies. E-mail Tom.

     

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