More HP notebook batteries recalled

Since the original 2009 recall and an expansion last year, more incidents of batteries overheating and resulting in injury or property damage have been reported, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

One of the battery models included in HP's latest recall CPSC

Hewlett-Packard is adding to the list of notebook battery models that pose a safety hazard, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

HP has voluntarily recalled an additional 162,600 lithium ion batteries used in some HP and Compaq notebooks sold between July 2007 and July 2008. The batches of batteries included with 31 models of its notebooks can "overheat and rupture, posing fire and burn hazards," according to the CPSC.

The latest round of batteries being recalled is in addition to the 70,000 recalled in May 2009 and 54,000 in May 2010 , all for the same reason: potential to overheat and rupture. Since last year's recall, 40 incidents of faulty batteries overheating or rupturing have been reported. The result has been seven burn injuries, one injury due to smoke inhalation, and 36 counts of property damage.

The CPSC is urging customers who were informed during prior recalls that their notebook and battery was not at risk to check again to see if their product is on the list. If it is, the CPSC says to remove the battery immediately and order a new one from HP, which will replace it for free.

For a complete list of notebook models and battery bar codes of the products affected by this recall, see the CPSC's Web site.

About the author

Erica Ogg is a CNET News reporter who covers Apple, HP, Dell, and other PC makers, as well as the consumer electronics industry. She's also one of the hosts of CNET News' Daily Podcast. In her non-work life, she's a history geek, a loyal Dodgers fan, and a mac-and-cheese connoisseur.

 

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