More DemoFall: Enterprise software for small businesses

Small business tools for managing the books and more.

Wait, there are still more tools for small businesses to get stuff done shown here at the conference this morning.

CashView.com lets small business users see all their documents online. It's a service for sending and receiving invoices, approvals, and commenting on them. There's also a calendar that shows when money is due or to be paid to you. It lets you review and zoom in on documents. The docs get online by faxing them to CashView and they upload them for you. Some people might actually have to buy a fax machine first.

Batch Book is a contact organizer. Each employee has a profile with hire date, schedule, personal details and specific project assignments. Companies or clients can also have their profiles created. Business owners can see any communications sent to and from different clients or partners. Users can also create mailing lists, labels and e-mail lists and to-do lists.

PlanHQ says it will help a business achieve its business plan. Every action item is in the browser and linked to a company goal, so you don't get off track, apparently. Managers can set priorities and deadlines. It also shows the history of actions and what is coming up. Each employee has a profile of goals and action items, called "what's on your plate." Everyone can also see what everyone else on the team is scheduled to do. It also has a feature that shows projected profitability based on what different parts of the company (marketing and sales, finance, executives) are doing.

About the author

Erica Ogg is a CNET News reporter who covers Apple, HP, Dell, and other PC makers, as well as the consumer electronics industry. She's also one of the hosts of CNET News' Daily Podcast. In her non-work life, she's a history geek, a loyal Dodgers fan, and a mac-and-cheese connoisseur.

 

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