MoFuse Grow makes a simple .mobi site from your RSS feeds

Plunking down your blog's RSS into MoFuse Grow instantly feeds it into a mobile-optimized site. The shortcuts end there, however, if you care to customize colors and domain name.

MoFuse Grow

MoFuse, a mobile Web site-creation service, has removed even more steps when converting a .com Web site into a .mobi site, which is optimized for viewing from a cell phone, smartphone, or any other Internet-lovin' device.

With MoFuse Grow beta, individual and business bloggers can simply feed their site's RSS link into the blank field to generate a MoFuse URL with a .mobi suffix. New users looking for a more articulate link are enticed to join the service, which has both free and affordable options (compared here with Zinadoo's similar offering.)

MoFuse Grow emulator
Images render nicely with MoFuse Grow.

The MoFuse Grow interface carries a lush pastoral theme, and stays true to its word with a straightforward field for pasting a copied RSS link. Another link ushers bloggers to a partially-emulated view of a stripped-down mobile site that, in turn, takes you to a full emulator with navigation and appropriately rendered images. Back on MoFuse Grow's landing page, there's a prominent area that market's MoFuse services and gives users the option to register so they can customize and style the newly-created mobile blog site, or buy into additional services, like choosing a catchier domain name.

MoFuse Grow is essentially a supremely accessible, one-click Web app for drawing users in and promoting MoFuse.com's more powerful and more involving WYSIWYG interface for customizing a blog's mobile look. The tool is a gift for those who want a no-fuss, no-muss way to get at their blogs from the small screen. Those who plan to share their URL around, however, are best served by Mofuse.com's full visual design process and by shedding the clumsy, free .mobi URL. For them, MoFuse Grow produces the bud, but by no means the blossom.

About the author

Jessica Dolcourt reviews smartphones and cell phones, covers handset news, and pens the monthly column Smartphones Unlocked. A senior editor, she started at CNET in 2006 and spent four years reviewing mobile and desktop software before taking on devices.

 

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