Missing teen hooked on Xbox found dead

Body of an Ontario 15-year-old who ran away after his gaming console was taken away--and triggered an online debate about gaming addition--was found by deer hunters.

We have a sad ending to the story of Brandon Crisp , the Ontario, Canada, boy who ran away from home after his dad took away his Xbox console.

Brandon Crisp
Brandon Crisp Barrie Police

The body of the 15-year-old, who had been missing since October 13, was found on Wednesday by deer hunters in a heavily wooded area about a mile or so away from where his bicycle was found two weeks earlier, according to police and press accounts.

An autopsy is scheduled for Friday, but based on preliminary evidence, police do not suspect foul play, according to news reports.

Crisp, according to his father and others, was hooked on the online game Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare, which led to concern that he may have run off to join fellow gamers. His story has captivated online communities around the globe--gamers and parents alike--who have been offering assistance, debating the addictive nature of online games, and are now leaving online condolences. A Facebook search on his name currently turns up 87 groups ranging in name from "Help Find Brandon Crisp!!!!" to "R.I.P. Brandon Crisp."

Xbox maker Microsoft also got involved in the case by agreeing to help investigators and doubling the amount being offered for information leading to Crisp's return to 50,000 Canadian dollars.

Crisp ran away on the day of Canadian Thanksgiving after having an argument with his parents, according to the police in his small town of Barrie, Ontario. His father, Steve Crisp, told local media that he had taken away his son's Xbox after noticing changes in behavior, such as skipping school, stealing money, and ignoring his studies.

See also: InformationWeek, "Xbox 'addict' Brandon Crisp found dead"; The Toronto Star, "Brandon Crisp found dead"; Macleans, "What happened to Brandon?"; and The Globe and Mail, "This is not the ending we wanted."

Tags:
Gaming
About the author

Michelle Meyers, associate editor, has been writing and editing CNET News stories since 2005. But she's still working to shed some of her old newspaper ways, first honed when copy was actually cut and pasted. When she's not fixing typos and tightening sentences, she's working with reporters on story ideas, tracking media happenings, or freshening up CNET News' home page.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Up for a challenge?

Put yourself to the real tech test by building your own virtual-reality headset with a few household items.