Microsoft's Surface tablet said to come with only Wi-Fi

While the software giant has yet to release full specs on its forthcoming tablet, rumors are circulating that it may be Wi-Fi only and without a mobile network connection

AP Photo/Microsoft

Microsoft unveils iPad rival
This product rendering released by Microsoft shows Surface, a 9.3 millimeter thick tablet with a kickstand to hold it upright and keyboard that is part of the device's cover. It weighs under 1.5 pounds. AP Photo/Microsoft

(CNET) Microsoft's much talked about Surface tablet may be Wi-Fi only, according to Bloomberg.

The news agency reports that people familiar with the tablet's specs say the device will go on sale without any mobile-phone network connection, but will come with a short-range Wi-Fi connection. This could change in later models.

A brief history of failed Windows tablets
Microsoft's Surface tablet vs. the iPad: Seven challenges
Google exec: "Surface is a very complicated strategy to pull off"

Surface will be running Microsoft's next-generation Windows operating system and marks the company's first foray into the ever-expanding tablet market. Though the software giant has unveiled Surface, it has yet to release all the details on the specifications.

Apparently, the tablet is thought to be a direct competitor to Apple's iPad. Network accessibility could hinder this goal, however. The new iPad, which went on sale in March, comes equipped with LTE and has the option of a mobile-phone chip, according to Bloomberg. Users can also buy the iPad's Wi-Fi-only model if they prefer.

According to Bloomberg, Microsoft plans to start selling the Surface later this year and will be working with Apple's iPhone-maker, Pegatron, to manufacture the tablet.

Microsoft did not immediately respond to CNET's  request for comment. 

This article originally appeared at CNET.

Featured Video

Tim Cook's blurry iPhone picture takes world by storm

What is the iPhone 6's "Error 53"? The new Apple tvOS brings new features and Tim Cook takes bad pictures.

by Brian Tong