Microsoft's Build 2013 keynote: Join us Wednesday (live blog)

The software giant brings its developers conference to San Francisco. Starting with the keynote speech at 9 a.m. PT Wednesday, CNET will be there live to bring you updates, photos, and commentary.

San Francisco's Moscone Center, prepped for Build 2013. James Martin/CNET

Microsoft will gather thousands of developers in San Francisco this week for its Build conference, with much of this year's event focused on generating excitement about updates to its Windows 8 operating system.

CNET will be there live on Wednesday, giving you the blow by blow of the opening keynote, with photos and running commentary as well. The keynote, which will offer a look at the Windows 8.1 update, starts at 9 a.m. PT at the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco.

You can tune in here:

CNET's live coverage of Microsoft Build 2013 keynote
The conference will focus on the latest batch of updates to Windows that, at least in part, address some of the criticisms of the operating system that hasn't sparked the sort of uptick in PC sales that some had expected. Critics have blamed the new tile-based, touch-focused interface as being too big a departure for longtime Windows customers.

Microsoft executives will also highlight a raft of new features--everything from a wider selection of tile sizes to the ability to personalize the Start screen. The conference will also likely offer plenty of sessions for developers to create applications that take advantage of the new features.

Microsoft is also expected to talk about its app store for Windows, something that it's been working to beef up since Windows 8 debuted. And the company may discuss the integration with other Microsoft products, such as its Xbox video game console.

CNET will use ScribbleLive to bring you live text and photos from the keynote, as they happen.

This story was originally published June 25 at 9 a.m. PT.

About the author

Jay Greene, a CNET senior writer, works from Seattle and focuses on investigations and analysis. He's a former Seattle bureau chief for BusinessWeek and author of the book "Design Is How It Works: How the Smartest Companies Turn Products into Icons" (Penguin/Portfolio).

 

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