Microsoft: We're not ready to talk beyond Vista

blog Microsoft says discussion of what will come after Vista is premature.

Microsoft would prefer that the press spend more time focusing on Windows Vista and less time writing about what will come next.

After a story in PC World last week quoted a Microsoft security executive saying the next Windows operating system would come in about two and a half years, the company put out a statement Tuesday saying discussion of the next Windows is premature.

"The launch of Windows Vista was an incredibly exciting moment for our customers and partners around the world, and the company is focused on the value Windows Vista will bring to people today," Kevin Kutz, director of the Windows client group, said in a statement. "We are not giving official guidance to the public yet about the next version of Windows, other than that we're working on it. When we are ready, we will provide updates."

Microsoft has, however, talked a bit about what is coming next. The company has said it is working on a service pack update to Vista.

In January 2006, Microsoft also said it had changed the code name of the next version of Windows from Blackcomb to Vienna. A Microsoft representative on Tuesday declined to confirm whether Vienna is still the code name.

And while Microsoft hasn't pinned down a date for the next version, CEO Steve Ballmer has been emphatic that it won't be five years, as was the case between the release of XP and Vista.

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    During her years at CNET News, Ina Fried has changed beats several times, changed genders once, and covered both of the Pirates of Silicon Valley. These days, most of her attention is focused on Microsoft. E-mail Ina.

     

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