Microsoft seeks Windows Mobile update leader

A job ad on Microsoft's Web page is seeking a software development team leader to work on improving the way Windows Mobile software updates are delivered.

Microsoft is looking for someone to help lead improvements to the Windows Mobile software update process. ZDnet

Windows Mobile's update system could be one of the many improvements that Microsoft has in store for Windows Mobile 7.

Ars Technica spotted a job ad on Microsoft's Web page seeking a lead software development engineer to work on a new update system for Windows Mobile. "Do you want to see greater and better quality and cool software delivered to your love ones' Windows phones from just a click?" the ad asks in searching for the right person to lead the Windows Mobile update team.

The process for getting new software onto Windows Mobile handsets could certainly be faster, as Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer admitted in March. Microsoft has to vet software updates through dozens of handset and carrier partners, and must direct Windows Mobile users to download that software in firmware updates from the carrier, not Microsoft. And then it takes several steps to get new software on the phone.

But with Microsoft's Windows Marketplace for Mobile scheduled to get up and running later this year, the company will have one central point of access for new software across all the Windows Mobile handsets in use. It's likely the improved update goal described in the job ad, however, is slated for Windows Mobile 7, which was originally supposed to be out this year but now isn't expected until 2010 .

Windows Mobile 7 is expected to contain user-interface improvements and better support for gestures. Windows Mobile has seen few significant changes since the iPhone shook up the mobile computing industry in 2007, and Microsoft has recognized that it needs to move more quickly.

About the author

    Tom Krazit writes about the ever-expanding world of Google, as the most prominent company on the Internet defends its search juggernaut while expanding into nearly anything it thinks possible. He has previously written about Apple, the traditional PC industry, and chip companies. E-mail Tom.

     

    Join the discussion

    Conversation powered by Livefyre

    Don't Miss
    Hot Products
    Trending on CNET

    HOT ON CNET

    Delete your photos by mistake?

    Whether you've deleted everything on your memory card or there's been a data corruption, here's a way to recover those photos.