Microsoft Live Search exec Goldberg departing

General manager Brad Goldberg is leaving Redmond and, according to TechFlash, headed to an investment firm. That's amid a number of recent executive changes for the tech titan.

Updated 9:35 a.m. PST with comment from Microsoft.

Microsoft's Live Search team is losing its general manager, Brad Goldberg, who reportedly is heading to the investment world.

Microsoft Redmond campus
Redmond from above. Microsoft

Seattle-focused Web site TechFlash reported late Tuesday that Goldberg will become CEO of the online business at Chicago-based Peak6 Investments. Microsoft told TechFlash that the impending departure of Goldberg was "amicable."

Replacing Goldberg early in 2009 will be Microsoft veteran Mike Nichols, who previously worked in strategic partnerships and search engineering, the report said.

Representatives of Microsoft and Peak6 were not immediately available for comment early Wednesday.

Later Wednesday morning, a Microsoft representative provided this statement:

We can confirm that Brad Goldberg has decided to leave Microsoft to pursue an opportunity outside the company. Mike Nichols, another Microsoft veteran, will take over as General Manager for Live Search product management effective January 1. We are pleased to welcome Mike to the team and wish Brad the very best in his new role.

There's been a rash of action on the search side of Microsoft's business recently. In November, the company said it had hired Yahoo executive Sean Suchter as general manager of its Silicon Valley Search Technology Center, specifically to address Live Search matters .

And earlier this month, Microsoft named Qi Lu , formerly of Yahoo, to head its online services business starting in January. Lu said this in a statement at the time:

Microsoft has built a great foundation for its search and advertising technologies and put an amazing team of researchers and engineers in place to drive the next wave of innovation in online services.

About the author

Jonathan Skillings is managing editor of CNET News, based in the Boston bureau. He's been with CNET since 2000, after a decade in tech journalism at the IDG News Service, PC Week, and an AS/400 magazine. He's also been a soldier and a schoolteacher, and will always be a die-hard fan of jazz, the brassier the better.

 

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