Microsoft fires two Bing execs for mismanaging business assets

The software giant says it has terminated the employment of Eric Hadley and Sean Carver over corporate policy violations.

Eric Hadley and Sean Carver at a party at the Sundance Film Festival in 2010. Microsoft; screenshot by Jay Greene/CNET

Microsoft has fired two executives in its Bing group for allegedly mismanaging corporate assets.

The company said this morning that it's terminated the employment of Eric Hadley and Sean Carver.

"We can confirm that as the result of an investigation, Eric Hadley and Sean Carver's employment with Microsoft has been terminated for violation of company policies related to mismanagement of company assets and vendor procurement," the company said in a statement.

The company declined to offer any more details about the alleged policy violations. Neither Hadley nor Carver replied to a request for comment sent via Twitter.

The news of the pair's firing was first reported by AdAge. According to that article, Microsoft found that the two executives violated "internal guidelines dictating relationships with outside vendors, which includes any number of partners, agencies or media companies."

Hadley had served as the general manager for marketing for Bing and MSN. Earlier this month, he posted an item on the MSN blog about a new partnership between Microsoft and Spotify during the SXSW conference.

Carver was director of Brand Entertainment at Microsoft. His role was to help build Bing's brand to draw in more users. Carver, along with Hadley, served as executive producers on "Para Fuera: A Portrait of Dr. Richard J. Bing," a documentary about Dr. Richard Bing that debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in 2010.

About the author

Jay Greene, a CNET senior writer, works from Seattle and focuses on investigations and analysis. He's a former Seattle bureau chief for BusinessWeek and author of the book "Design Is How It Works: How the Smartest Companies Turn Products into Icons" (Penguin/Portfolio).

 

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