Microsoft committed to ARM platform, new stuff on the way

Redmond says that, despite recent blows, it remains committed to the ARM chip platform, the tech that underlies Windows RT tablets and Windows Phone devices.

Surface RT: Microsoft said it is still 'committed to the ARM platform.'
Surface RT: Microsoft said it is still "committed to the ARM platform." Microsoft

It's been a bad week for Windows RT. But Microsoft told CNET that it's still committed -- to ARM.

On Thursday, Nvidia's CEO suggested that RT -- which runs on its Tegra ARM chips -- is hurting its bottom line, and then a report surfaced Friday saying that Asus was exiting the RT tablet business .

That's not deterring Microsoft. "Windows remains committed to the ARM platform," a Microsoft spokesman told CNET.

And more ARM devices are on the way. "We are looking forward to new ARM-based Windows devices that will launch later this year," the spokesman added.

This follows comments that Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang made to CNET on Thursday. Huang said Nvidia is "working really hard" on the second-generation Surface.

Back in March, Michael Angiulo, corporate vice president, speaking with CNET, expounded on Microsoft's reasons for committing to RT. "It was a ton of work for us and we didn't do the work and endure the disruption for any reason other than the fact that there's a strategy there that just gets stronger over time."

Whether that reasoning still applies today isn't clear.

Note that ARM is not necessarily synonymous with Windows RT at Microsoft. In addition to RT tablets, the company's Windows Phone platform also runs on ARM chips.

Asus at one time offered the Vivo Tab RT. But the company will stop making RT tablets.
Asus at one time offered the Vivo Tab RT. But the company will stop making RT tablets. Asus

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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