Microsoft, bias, and blogging

For those who expect this blog to be balanced, forget it. It's an open-source blog with a definite angle.

I'm always amused by comments on this blog suggesting that I'm biased against Microsoft. Of course I am . I'm a blogger, not a journalist. Who told you otherwise?

I compete with Microsoft and am a strong believer in open source. I'm biased. That said, I'm also an admirer of much of Microsoft's technology. It is not easy to make software that works well (or reasonably well) for such a widely disparate global population of users. Microsoft tends to make complex technology look easy.

So, I have professional respect for Microsoft, both technology and business practices. I also have professional disdain for Microsoft, both technology and business practices. It's hard to be overwhelmingly for or against Microsoft.

Yes, you'll read a fair number of posts on this blog that are critical of Microsoft. Get used to it. You see, it's an open source blog, and until Steve Ballmer figures out how to say "open source" without throwing up in his mouth, there will likely be an "anti-Microsoft" angle to many of the themes I cover. If you want the rosy view on Microsoft, head over to the MSDN blogs and lose yourself in praise of Microsoft.

But if you stop off here, expect to hear criticism of Microsoft. If you don't like it, there are lots of other blogs on the planet to read. Just don't waste my time with comments that complain that I don't love Microsoft more. Microsoft has billions in the bank. It doesn't need my love.

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