Microsoft and its missed Kinect-ions

If Microsoft is so focused on persuading us that Kinect is the future of Xbox 360, why didn't the company tease some of the best games for the platform?

Why didn't Microsoft show off Fruit Ninja Kinect at E3? Halfbrick

It's no secret that Microsoft went all in with Kinect in regards to the future of Xbox 360 last week at E3. While the first part of the company's E3 press conference showed off just a few Xbox 360 games, nearly everything afterward was focused on Kinect's role in the remaining lifespan of the console.

We were mostly underwhelmed with the upcoming Kinect lineup and frankly disappointed in how some games like Star Wars Kinect actually played. Microsoft also appears to be tacking Kinect functionality onto games that arguably don't really need another dimension of control (see Mass Effect 3 and Ghost Recon Future Soldier).

So if Microsoft is so focused on persuading us that Kinect is the future of Xbox 360, why didn't the company tease some of the best games for the platform? As CNET editor Scott Stein can attest , Q Entertainment's Child of Eden is the most fun we've had with Kinect in months. The game is a spectacular presentation of psychedelic vector art and motion-controlled music implementation. Eden has Kinect players use each hand as a different weapon as you travel through what appears to be a chaotic wormhole through space and time.

Child of Eden is a mind-trip that needs to be played by anyone with Kinect. Ubisoft/Q Entertainment

For such a unique game that plays better using Kinect than a controller, where was it during the press conference?

Another title we're scratching our heads over is Halfbrick's Fruit Ninja Kinect (August 3, XBLA). While Microsoft does have the multimillion-selling iOS and Android fruit-slicing game in its respectable 2011 Summer of Arcade showcase, the heavily recognizable brand should have been front and center at E3. We had some hands-on time with the game recently and it's a blast to play, even if some limbs felt like they were dislocated midway through.

At the very least, we're happy to see Microsoft finally embrace Kinect hackers and open up the independent scene to prospective developers. Hopefully this will help fuel creative Kinect applications and give more options for those who dropped $150 on it.

 

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