Meet IRIS, Asus' incredible shape-shifting gadget

Asus' concept for the next generation of personal devices is an exotic display that can be stretched into all sorts of form factors.

Why is all the cool stuff going to come out when I'm almost dead? Screenshot by Christopher MacManus/CNET

One day, you might be able to turn your watch into a tablet--by stretching it.

At the CeBit tech fair in Hannover, Germany, Asus is showing off IRIS (Inspirational Research for Immersive Space), its vaporware concept for the next generation of personal computing devices.

IRIS can be whatever you want it to be, such as an alarm clock, watch, cell phone, e-reader, tablet, or gaming device. You simply slide the edge of the flexible display outward or inward. My favorite thing about this futuristic adaptive device, aside from its incredible style, is that it aims to eliminate the need to carry multiple gadgets. As smartphones, tablets, and other devices evolve, it seems more obvious that they will eventually converge while somehow maintaining portability. Zach Morris would so have this in "Saved by the Bell: 2040."

To see how IRIS would work in real life, check out this excellent video of the concept by ElectricPig at CeBit.

Asus has other plans for this exotic concept, such as base station accessories with a built-in projector that can give your bedroom the psychedelic feel of a Jimi Hendrix concert. Asus believes the projector could create dynamic sleep environments with ambient lighting and interactive alarms such as 3D birds projected above that chirp loudly. But can I shoot them with a virtual boomstick?

IRIS is truly meant to be ultraportable, and could come with accessories such as a wristband. I'm sure this won't cost a fortune.

 

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