Medsphere, Keane team to help hospital

Medsphere is opening up the health care market, one hospital at a time. It signs a notable deal with Century City Doctors Hospitalin Los Angeles.

Medsphere is off to a roaring start with its new CEO, signing Century City Doctors Hospital (CCDH) in Los Angeles in a major deal that sees $1.2 million going to Keane Consulting for the implementation and a sizable (but unannounced) sum going to Medsphere.

Few know this about Medsphere, but its deals can stretch into seven-figure deals, but it can also scale down to meet tight budgets. Perhaps small change by traditional ERP standards, where the bill can run past $100 million, but that's the point. Medsphere makes high-end Vista easy enough to use that even smaller hospitals can tap into its advantages. Kudos to the Shreeve brothers for recognizing the value Vista could bring while they slogged through medical school.

CCDH is certainly grateful:

CCDH selected OpenVista based on its evolution from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) highly respected Vista EHR, Medsphere's successful deployment of OpenVista at other community hospitals, and OpenVista's ability to integrate with Keane's EZ-Access Patcom revenue cycle management application suite to provide best-of-suite clinical and financial capabilities.

"Our goal in selecting an electronic health record was to find a vendor that offered pre-built integration between modules because we had limited time and capital to handle a large number of third-party vendors. Medsphere's OpenVista provided that integration as well as the Vista pedigree," said Joel Bergenfeld, CEO of Century City Doctors Hospital. "The Medsphere platform is Vista at the core, and that gives us the benefit of more than two decades of VA field-testing along with documented proof of improved quality of care."

Open-source healthcare. I love it.

It's good to see Medsphere looking forward again. Still, customer wins like these would be all the sweeter if the company's board could come to a peaceful resolution with its founders, Scott and Steve Shreeve. There is blame on both sides, but nothing that justifies a $50 million lawsuit against two entrepreneurs who created what the board manages today.

It's time to resolve the past.

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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