MCE Tunes: iTunes content in Windows Media Center

An add-in application that allows for playing protected Apple iTunes content within Windows Media Center user interface and Microsoft Xbox 360 Gaming Console.

Proxure

Despite the fact that iTunes has been getting so bloated with so many features and functions, it's arguably still the best software to manage your music. And now there's a way to play its content, as well as using its playlists, in the Media Center user interface if you use Windows Media Center as your entertainment center.

Proxure announced on Monday its MCE Tunes software application that allows for complete iTunes libraries access, including purchased music and video content, from within Microsoft's Windows Media Center (MCE) interface or Windows Media Player.

On top of that, MCE Tunes can also stream iTunes music to Microsoft Xbox 360 gaming consoles or other Media Center Extender devices.

I tried the application briefly with my Windows Media Center 2005 and it worked as intended. There wasn't much to do. Once installed and launched, the MCE Tunes interface allows for merging iTunes' library with MCE's library. You can choose different criteria for the merge, such as: the whole library, just content rated with certain amount of stars, or certain playlists.

The merge only happens once, and when you want to share more music from iTunes to MCE, you'll need to run MCE Tunes and repeat the process. However, there's also an option for MCE Tunes to automatically perform this task everyday for those who add more music and video to iTunes regularly.

Other features of the MCE Tunes include:

  • iTunes playlists automatically recreated in Windows Media Player (including compilation albums).
  • All file metadata is carried over to Windows Media Player.
  • iTunes track ratings are carried over to Windows Media Player.
  • Album artwork is carried over to Windows Media Player.

You can download the trial version of MCE Tunes, which limits playback to 20 tracks, and does not include video playback support. The full version of the software costs $30.

Dong Ngo/CNET Networks

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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