Mazda reboots itself at Geneva with Minagi concept

Mazda will unveil the Minagi concept at the 2011 Geneva auto show, which shows off new design language and efficiency technologies.

Mazda Minagi concept
The Minagi concept is a compact SUV showing off Mazda's Kodo design language. Mazda

After being cut loose from Ford, Mazda seemed to lack direction, but its new Minagi concept showcases a rethought design language along with a line of fuel-efficient technologies. The Minagi concept will be unveiled at the Geneva auto show in March.

Mazda Minagi concept
This concept employs Mazda's SkyActiv technologies, designed to improve fuel economy. Mazda

Mazda spent most of the last decade showing concepts that embodied its Nagare design language, which featured organically contoured lines. Nagare began to see some slight realization in the Mazda3 and Mazda5.

But with a new chief designer in charge, Mazda junked Nagare for Kodo, first seen when the Shinari concept was unveiled in Paris last year. Mazda describes Kodo as "soul of motion." Looking at both the Shinari and Minagi concepts, Kodo involves an upright polyhedral grille and a pronounced hood rising up above the front fenders. Some of this design language seems to have evolved from the RX-8.

The Minagi takes on the form of a compact SUV, a style of vehicle that has become very popular, judging from all the concepts using this form at the Detroit auto show. Mazda envisages the Minagi as an urban vehicle, and suggests it heralds an entirely new model lineup.

Mazda is also using the Minagi to show off its SkyActiv technologies. The engine will be a small displacement direct-injection gasoline engine, SkyActiv-G, or a diesel, SkyActiv-D. Mazda's SkyActiv body and chassis means lighter weight and greater rigidity, while the SkyActiv transmission is an automatic with a lock-up clutch, to eliminate torque converter slippage.

About the author

Wayne Cunningham reviews cars and writes about automotive technology for CNET. Prior to the Car Tech beat, he covered spyware, Web building technologies, and computer hardware. He began covering technology and the Web in 1994 as an editor of The Net magazine. He's also the author of "Vaporware," a novel that's available as a Nook e-book.

 

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