Martin Jetpack gives you turbines, lets you fly

The $90,000 jetpack will travel a grand distance of 31.5 miles at a maximum speed of 63 mph, which should comfortably take you from home to office (and back) in a jiffy, and with a lot of noise.

Martin Jetpack
Martin Aircraft

Since I was young, I've dreamed of being a pilot. I'm still nowhere close to that shining goal as age slowly creeps up on me.

My next target is to cough up $90,000, which again is a near-impossible ambition as I am a poorly paid scribe. At least I can write about it. Humpf.

The Martin Jetpack by New Zealand's Martin Aircraft is the closest thing to bringing my childhood fantasies to life. If I place an order now and put down a 10 percent deposit, it could be mine in 12 months. The problem is coming up with the other 90 percent. No license is required to fly this in the U.S., though regulations may differ in other countries.

The jetpack itself is 5 feet tall and 5.5 feet wide and made of a carbon fiber composite with a pinch of Kevlar for the rotor. It uses regular gasoline and will travel a grand distance of 31.5 miles at a maximum speed of 63 mph, which should comfortably take you from home to office (and back) in a jiffy, and with a lot of noise.

Assuming you have chump change for such an indulgence, you'll still need to pass a training program before taking receipt of the jetpack, so you don't randomly crash into walls or dive into a gas station. Should such an unfortunate eventuality occur, a ballistic parachute system will (hopefully) lift you away from danger, although it doesn't redeem you from looking stupid.

Martin Jetpack
Martin Aircraft

(Source: Crave Asia via Wired)

 

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