Mars experiment could benefit insomniacs

Scientists have discovered that light therapy might help people whose insomnia is caused an internal body clock that's longer or shorter than normal.

Insomniacs may have reason to hope. Hope, that is, beyond prescription drugs that have recently been known to turn some users into sleepwalking wrecks.

Scientists have discovered that light therapy might help people whose insomnia is caused by an internal body clock that is longer or shorter than normal, according to an article from Reuters. Researchers from Harvard found that light therapy can help astronauts having a hard time adjusting to life on Mars, where days last nearly 25 hours.

According to the research, which was commissioned by NASA, two 45-minute exposures to bright light in the evening could help people whose sleep rhythm is out of balance.

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    Stefanie Olsen covers technology and science.

     

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