Marissa Mayer won't be immediately replaced at Google

The duties of the former key VP and new Yahoo CEO will be distributed to members of her former team, sources tell All Things D.

New Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer. James Martin/CNET

Google has no immediate plans to replace Marissa Mayer, who was named Yahoo's chief executive today.

Mayer's duties as Google's VP of local, maps, and localization services will be picked up by members of her team, sources with knowledge of the organization told All Things D. Her former lieutenants will now report to Jeff Huber, Google's SVP of commerce and local, the sources said.

Google declined to comment on the report.

Mayer, Google's first female engineer and the No. 20 employee hired overall, announced her departure today for the top job at struggling Web pioneer Yahoo. After graduating from Stanford University with a master's degree in computer science, Mayer joined then-upstart search company Google.

During her tenure at the Web giant, Mayer supervised the fast-growing business that proved key to Google's growth during the past decade. While Mayer, 37, served as the executive in charge of search products and user experience, the number of daily searches on Google exploded from a few hundred thousand to over a billion.

She also played a role in the design and development of the company's iconic search interface, as well as Google News, Gmail, and the Orkut social network.

Google CEO Larry Page said Mayer would be missed.

"Since arriving at Google just over 13 years ago as employee No. 20, Marissa has been a tireless champion of our users," Page said in a statement. "She contributed to the development of our Search, Geo, and Local products. We will miss her talents at Google."

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