Map shows every meteorite impact since 2,300 B.C.

The map was developed by Javier de la Torre, co-founder of Vizzuality and CartoDB.

A look at meteorite impact sites in the U.S.
A look at meteorite impact sites in the U.S. Screenshot by Don Reisinger/CNET

Want to find out where every meteorite recorded since 2,300 B.C. has fallen on Earth? A new map will help you out.

Javier de la Torre, co-founder of software companies Vizzuality and CartoDB, has posted a heat map showing where the meteorites have fallen over the last several thousand years. According to The Verge, which first reported on the map and spoke with de la Torre, 34,513 individual impact points are recorded on the map.

De la Torre claims that it took him only 30 minutes to record the impacts. He used OpenStreetMap, a crowdsourced platform, for the map, and then input impact sites from data collected by the Meteorological Society.

To be sure, the impact sites are not all of the meteorites that have made their way through Earth's atmosphere and struck something. Many meteorites, in fact, fall into the oceans. The data in de la Torre's map includes only those confirmed and recorded impact sites.

The map was published just days after the world was shaken by news of a meteorite strike in Russia . Speaking to The Verge, de la Torre said that he believes "people got curious about meteorites after the Russian one."

If you want to check out de la Torre's map, click here. You can zoom down into your area to see the last time it was struck.

 

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