Map Katrina two years later

The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration unveils a newly updated Web site that lets people call up a map of the storm that wreaked havoc on the Gulf Coast.

On the second anniversary of Hurricane Katrina Wednesday, the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) unveiled a newly updated Web site that lets people call up a map of the storm that wreaked havoc on the Gulf Coast, along with other hurricanes that occurred along the Atlantic coast over the last 150 years.

"The recently updated Web site includes historical tropical cyclone data and information on coastal county hurricane strikes through 2006," according to NOAA. People can search for hurricanes by name, year, U.S. ZIP code, state or county, as well as by using latitude and longitude points. Or they can compare population changes in U.S. coastal cities from 1900 to 2000 against hurricane strikes in those cities, as a means to gauge the danger of living in a particular county.

Still, during a test of the site, which is appropriately called NOAA Historical Hurricane Tracks, the mapping feature was not available. NOAA may still be working out the kinks.

Update: This blog post incorrectly stated how long ago Hurricane Katrina happened. Also, incorrect html coding was preventing the site's link from appearing.

 

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