Man steals church computer, demands porn block removed

For some, it's not enough to steal from a holy place. They have to complain to the church's tech support that someone has inserted a porn blocker. This was allegedly the case with Troy Ridling, church member.

The company that won't bend to porn. Screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Some people deal with guilt better than others. Religions can help with the process.

There are, though, sinners who simply find a way to compartmentalize their deeds and emotions, and prioritize their essential needs.

Let us bow our heads and contemplate, then, the story of Troy Ridling.

No, this isn't a male porn star. Instead, he's a member of the Owasso First Assembly of God in Oklahoma.

It came to pass that one of the church's computers was stolen. As KRMG Radio reports, the church initially suspected this was an inside job.

But who would do such a thing? No one had a clue.

The case received a breakthrough when a tracking software company called Covenant Eyes contacted the church to say there had been some suspicious activity on the stolen computer.

Whoever had it was allegedly seeking pornographic succor.

Even more sinful, perhaps, was the accusation that this person had even asked Covenant Eyes to avert its covenant eyes and allow a porn blocker to be removed for his visual pleasure.

Covenant Eyes is a fascinating company. It sends a simple report that shows precisely where your computer or smartphone has wandered along the Web's treacherous paths.

It also seems to be the publisher of the seminal work "Your Brain On Porn." This is subtitled: "Learn the five ways pornography warps your mind and 3 biblical ways to renew it."

Some might be surprised that there are only five ways.

Police say that Ridling has made his confession and has now been released from the Tulsa County Jail.

He is charged with burglary and possession of the devil. I am so sorry, I mean possession of stolen property.

Thieves do react differently once their deeds are done. On Thursday, we were still in deep thought about the people who had stolen several computers from a Sexual Assault Services Office in California .

Overcome with remorse when they'd found out whose computers they were, the thieves broke back into the building, returned the devices, and even left a note of apology.

Ridling, however, appears to have been led far too readily into temptation.

Now may come a time for repentance and sore punishment.

 

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