Making Android phones is "like peeing yourself" says Nokia boss

Outgoing Nokia boss Anssi Vanjoki reckons Android phone manufacturers such as HTC and Samsung are "peeing in their pants".

Nokia boss Anssi Vanjoki may be halfway out of the door, but it's clear he won't be firing off a CV to Samsung, Motorola or HTC anytime soon. The frank Finn reckons manufacturers adopting Android are "peeing in their pants".

Vanjoki told the Financial Times that adopting Google's mobile operating system is a short-term measure that will lead to problems down the line, like wetting yourself for warmth. That's just taking the micturate.

Vanjoki reckons Android makes it impossible for manufacturers to differentiate their devices from the competition, which is why Nokia has stuck with spending millions on developing Symbian.

He's got a point, but in our experience consumers know the name of a phone first and that it's powered by Android second -- a distant second, in the case of most high-street punters. HTC isn't exactly hopping from foot to foot struggling to distinguish itself from the competition with vastly popular mobiles such as the Desire and Legend .

Then again, Desire owners know better than anyone that Android isn't without its problems : manufacturer or network customisation can lead to a wee delay on hotly anticipated updates to the OS reaching your phone. Android is still an attractive prospect for manufacturers though, being as how it's free and all. 

Sony doesn't share the trouser-staining sentiment, as it's currently advertising for Android engineers to work on software as a service, mobile application development and helping PlayStation games teams. Rumours suggest this could be a hint at an Android-powered PSP phone .

If Android is wetting yourself for warmth, then what bodily function does Nokia, BlackBerry or iPhone -- actually, better not. Normally we'd ask for a suggestion in the comments, but just this once, keep it to yourself. Hold it in, as it were.

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Phones
About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

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