Make your scoops stackable

Ice cream scoop by Cuisipro digs into the hardest ice creams to create ice cream discs.

The ice cream discs work for stacking between cookies or inside a cone. Sur la table

Has anyone ever tried to create those ice-cream-parlor-style double scoops at home? Did they turn out like you had planned? Yeah, I thought so.

Maybe you could make a multiscoop tower of frozen goodness if you had a supply of gigantic waffle cones on hand, but if you're trying to fit that much ice cream in a normal-size cone, chances are that you'll run into problems. If you think about it, you wouldn't try to stack bouncy balls or baseballs, so why should you try to stack spherical balls of ice cream? And have you ever tried to recreate a perfectly spherical ball of ice cream from a frozen block straight out of the freezer? Maybe you've had success, but mine always seem to turn out like ice cream spikes, flakes, or plates.

Thankfully, the Cuisipro Ice Cream Scoop kills two birds with one stone: it creates the perfect shape for stacking while, at the same time, it allows you to dig into even the toughest blocks of ice cream.

Much like scientists in the Antarctic taking an ice core sample, you get a scoop of ice cream by plunging the metal scoop straight into the top surface of your pint or half gallon of ice cream. The resulting scoop is a flat-topped disc of the tasty treat that's perfect for stacking as a pretty presentation or inside a cone. The sides of the scoop are nonstick, so your scoop releases easily, and the syringe plunger-like handle helps you pop the scoop into a standard jumbo or waffle cone. And at a price of only about $15.00, it's a totally accessible way to spruce up your next dessert.

Tags:
Gadgets
About the author

    Jenn Lowell spent her time at the University of Colorado building robots and other toys before earning her graduate degree in mechatronics and mechanical engineering. She is a self-proclaimed lover of anything that runs off of electricity and has moving parts or motors. Currently pulling double-duty as a high school science teacher and freelance blogger, she has free time seldom enough to deeply appreciate the modern technological conveniences that give her more of it. She is a long-time recreational blogger currently living and working in Brooklyn, NY.

     

    Join the discussion

    Conversation powered by Livefyre

    Show Comments Hide Comments