MacWorld for the fashionista

Amid the crowds talking up specs and speed on the MacWorld show floor, there were those also concerned with fashion and flair.

At almost every vendor booth, particularly those showcasing iPod accessories, you could find something pink or girlie, be it a fuzzy iPod case, handmade flowery laptop sleeves or embellishments for computer screens. But we also found some stylin' new products that cross the gender lines.

MacWorldflair

One of our favorite finds, in terms of sheer retro funkiness, is Lifepod's collection of the modern day ghetto blaster. These bags and coolers have speakers on the outside and hook up to your iPod. Lifepod's Brad Bengis, who was with local break dancers promoting the product, said the initial appeal was to young people, but it turns out people of all ages are buying them. The prices aren't listed on the Lifepod site, but they range from about $30 to about $120.

Another neat find--this more for the woman in you--is Rebe's line of handmade colorful fabric gadget bags. The newest "Maude" bag, designed to carry an iPod, Palm and cell phone, sells for $66. Laptop sleeves cost $78.

Among the cool iPod cases: iFace incorporates cases and art by featuring limited production quantities of interchangeable fabric covers (see Hot Wave Series) for about $20 that fit over an inner case; Chums featured some great looking leather, canvas and hounds tooth models; and Marware caught our eye particularly for its iPod Nano case that is incorporated into a leather wallet (about $35).

Also mixing gadgets and artistry was vendor ETCHamac, which specializes in laser etching for laptops and iPods. On display was an etched pink Hello Kitty iPod.

There were also the MacColors Silicone Slips for the iMac G5 made by MacGear. We found the product's slogan just as, well, interesting as the product itself: "We've brought the color back to the Mac."

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About the author

Michelle Meyers, associate editor, has been writing and editing CNET News stories since 2005. But she's still working to shed some of her old newspaper ways, first honed when copy was actually cut and pasted. When she's not fixing typos and tightening sentences, she's working with reporters on story ideas, tracking media happenings, or freshening up CNET News' home page.

 

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