Linksys ships its first 802.11ac router and media bridge

The Smart Wi-Fi Router AC 1750 HD Video Pro, the latest in Linksys' Smart Wi-Fi lineup, supports the 802.11ac standard and much more.

The Cisco Connect Cloud is the heart of Linksys Smart Wi-Fi routers.
The Cisco Connect Cloud is the heart of Linksys Smart Wi-Fi routers. Dong Ngo/CNET

Linksys today announced the availability of its latest Smart Wi-Fi router, the Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Router AC 1750 HD Video Pro router (model EA6500). This is the company's first router to support the latest 802.11ac Wi-Fi standard.

The new router is to compete with similar routers from other networking vendors, such as the Netgear R6300 , the D-Link DIR-865L , and the Buffalo AirStation WZR-D1800H .

Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Router AC 1750 HD Video Pro router
Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Router AC 1750 HD Video Pro router Linksys

Taking an approach similar to Buffalo's, along with the EA6500 router Linksys announced a 802.11ac media bridge, the Linksys AC Universal Media Connector (model Linksys WUMC710), which makes it possible to add up to four Ethernet-ready devices to the Wi-Fi network.

Both the new router and the media bridge support all existing standards of Wi-Fi, with speeds of up to 450Mbps when used with Wireless-N (802.11n) and 1,300Mbps when used with 802.11ac.

On top of that, like others in Linksys' Smart Wi-Fi Router family, such as the recently reviewed EA4500 , the new EA6500 router will support the Cisco Cloud Connect platform . This means users can manage the router via the Internet using a browser or mobile app. They can also use third-party apps to get out more of their home network.

Linksys says the new router will offer great performance and range. Both the new Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Router AC 1750 HD Video Pro router and the Linksys AC Universal Media Connector are available for purchase now with estimated prices of $220 and $160. Check back soon for an in-depth review.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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