Lexar JumpDrive Triton review: More than just USB, it's USA!

CNET Editor Dong Ngo reviews the JumpDrive Triton USB 3.0-based thumbdrive. For fans of jumping to the point: it's great.

The Lexar JumpDrive Triton is one of few storage devices that are not Made in China.
The Lexar JumpDrive Triton is one of few storage devices that are not made in China. Dong Ngo/CNET

This is not one of those typical thumbdrives being given out at social events. For one thing, the Lexar JumpDrive Triton may be the first device I've run into in a long, long time that doesn't bear the "Made in China" label. Instead, there's a message on its back that clearly reads "Product of USA." While it's unclear if the drive is actually made entirely in the States, one thing is for sure: it holds a lot more appeal than just patriotic sentiment.

The Triton is the first USB 3.0-based thumbdrive I've worked with and it also happened to offer the fastest write speed I've seen, even when compared with a full-size USB 3.0 external hard drive. Considering this is a storage device that's just about the size of a lady's thumb, that's really impressive.

And the Triton is great-looking and sturdy, too, with a shiny metal alloy base and a high-gloss mirror-finish plastic top. Its USB head can be retracted into the housing to keep the drive compact for travel, and it's easily pushed out again to connect to a computer. The drive has an eyelet opening on the other end and includes a lanyard so you can attach it to a key ring.

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The only two small complaints I have about the drive are the fact that it comes with just 64GB of storage space at most and it's relatively expensive. The Triton's three capacities are 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB, costing about $60, $80, and $200, respectively. However, in this case, you really get what you pay for.

For more information on how the drive stacked up against its peers, check out the full review of the Lexar JumpDrive Triton.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews 3D printers, networking/storage devices, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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