Lexar announces $900 256GB SD card for pro video

Professional video buffs might be excited about Lexar's combination of speed and capacity, but the rest of us can look forward to more affordable mainstream SD cards.

Lexar's 256GB UHS-1 SDXC card was introduced with a retail price of $900 and can keep up with 60MBps data-transfer rates.
Lexar's 256GB UHS-1 SDXC card was introduced with a retail price of $900 and can keep up with 60MBps data-transfer rates. Lexar

COLOGNE, Germany -- Three words describe the Lexar Professional 400x SDXC UHS-I memory card: big, fast, and expensive.

The company is pitching the $900 card at those who need to shoot lots of 1080p or 3D video, a market noted for its capacity-gobbling files, intolerance for hiccups in data transfer, and deep pockets.

The card can transfer data at a sustained speed of 60MBps, and it will ship in October, the Micron subsidiary said. The company does offer faster cards with a 600x rating, but they top out at 64GB capacities.

As usual, ordinary photographers shouldn't bother getting excited about this high-end product. What's more worthy of a quickening of the heart is that it signals lower prices and better performance for mainstream models that can be manufactured more cheaply.

The company boasted its parent company's chip manufacturing abilities, which include 128-megabit flash chips manufactured with a process that can inscribe features mearsuring 20nm (20 billionths of a meter), made the card possible.

"By utilizing Micron's industry-leading, 128Gb, 20nm NAND flash memory process technology, Lexar is the first to market a 256GB SDXC card," said Wes Brewer, Lexar's vice president, products and technology. "Using a combination of creative die-stacking techniques and uniquely engineered firmware in our UHS-I capable controller, we were able to design and produce this product sooner than our competition. With the introduction of this product, we have achieved the optimal blend of price and performance desired by our retail and non-retail customers."

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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