Lenovo preps for grueling Olympic tests

Most of company's hardware will be put to the test next month in an intensive tech rehearsal conducted by the Beijing 2008 organizing committee.

Over 300 Lenovo engineers will be involved in a three-day comprehensive technology rehearsal next month, in what is described as the most grueling test in preparation for the Beijing 2008 Olympics starting August 8.

In a company statement Thursday, the hardware manufacturer said the second technical rehearsal from June 10 to 12 simulating the busiest three days of the global sporting event, will test nearly 95 percent of Lenovo computing equipment at each venue.

According to Alice Li, Lenovo's vice president of Olympic marketing, the BOCOG (Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad) will, during this rehearsal, "hit the 'on' switch, implementing all the technology systems and look for anything that can possibly go wrong."

Lenovo reported that over 20,000 pieces of Lenovo equipment have been tested during the year-long Good Luck Beijing testing phase, which will conclude on June 1.

Equipment for the Beijing 2008 Olympics was selected to complement the various sporting venues, said Lenovo. For instance, the ThinkCentre M55e capable of working in damp environments has been tested at conditions of up to 90 percent humidity in the Beijing National Aquatics Center.

In preparation for the Olympics, Lenovo is training 580 engineers to operate and troubleshoot the notebooks and desktops. The individuals are first trained in a classroom setting and then tested in mock exercises. The BOCOG will also conduct additional training sessions with engineering teams from various Olympic partners, the company said.

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