Lego remakes popular ads and makes whole ad break Lego-only

In a fascinating stunt in the UK, Lego recreates four ads in Lego and then runs them back-to-back to promote "The Lego Movie."

The Lego version of the terrible soccer player, but great actor, known as Vinnie Jones. Warner Bros/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

The folks at Lego are keen on dominating the world, but they're very clever in the way they go about it.

On Sunday night, TV viewers in the UK were gripped by a show of maximum import. It's called "Dancing On Ice." And it's exactly what you think it is.

Unable to move during the ad break -- this is a very exciting show -- they were then subjected to a Lego takeover, the likes of which they couldn't have imagined.

For Lego had remade four popular British TV spots, all in Lego and run them back-to-back, interspersed with promos for the new "Lego Movie."

The ads are, of course, very British. So I've displayed the original versions below for your examination.

The first features the very-poor-soccer-player-turned-very-fine-actor Vinnie Jones. What is bracing is just how perfectly Lego has rendered his every facial nuance.

Indeed, I'm sure that all the actors in the real ads will be immediately ordering Lego versions of themselves and displaying them on their mantelpieces.

In an interesting commercial twist, Creative Review reports that Lego didn't pay the three commercial brands (the British Heart Foundation is a nonprofit) in order to rework their ads. The brands actually paid Lego. Now there's world power for you.

Seeing two Lego characters kissing each other is still a touch difficult to embrace. However, this is surely an inspired way to make adults relive their pasts and want to recreate their presents.

I wonder if Lego's next step will be to recreate the whole of "Dancing On Ice." Could it possibly improve on the original?

 

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