Lego bus stop: Your next ride is 'just a brick away'

Commuting on public transportation can be frustrating and infuriating. Would a Lego bus station help lighten the tedium?

Copyright Transport for London

Most people don't hang around a bus stop if they don't plan to catch a ride. But that could change as word travels about the London bus shelter made entirely of Lego bricks. Like, 100,000 of them.


Trueform, a designer and installer of transport systems, built the bricky structure as part of Transport for London's "Year of the Bus," 12 months of events, exhibitions, and activities aimed at celebrating the city's buses.

The Regent Street stop, located outside a Hamley's toy store that's no doubt Lego-filled, has Lego everything -- walls, route sign, the pole attached to said route sign, the bench. For those worried that sitting on Legos might be akin to stepping on them barefoot, "Sitting on Lego bricks is surprisingly comfortable," one rider reported on Twitter.

Duncan Titmarsh, the UK's "only certified Lego professional" (and possibly holder of the best job ever) helped create the shelter, which took two weeks to build.

"Many thousands of people pass along Regent Street each day and we hope the new shelter will bring a smile to the face of even a hardened commuter," said Leon Daniels, Transport for London's managing director of surface transport.

The Lego bus shelter will remain in place -- and continue to make all other bus shelters in its shadow look sad -- through July 15.

Copyright Transport for London

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