LED-light health implants get under your skin

A team from the University of Illinois has created tiny LED arrays that can be implanted beneath the skin to show the condition of wounds or deliver drugs.

University of Illinois

Ever wanted to glance at your arm and see not a watch but the time displayed right there on your wrist, alongside an illuminated read-out of your health and a glittering tattoo? A team from the University of Illinois has taken a step in that direction with the creation of tiny LED arrays that can be implanted beneath the skin to show the condition of wounds or deliver cancer-beating drugs.

The band of intrepid scientists has published in the journal Nature details of miniscule LED arrays measuring 2.5 micrometers thick and 100x100 micrometers square. That's slightly less than the thickness of a yeast cell, while the surface area is the length of a dust particle on one side and the same length as the thickness of a coat of paint on the other. The array is encased in silicon and rubber that will bend and flex, making it waterproof and safe to implant beneath the skin.

Read more of " LED-light health implants get under your skin " at Crave UK.

About the author

Rich Trenholm is a senior editor at CNET where he covers everything from phones to bionic implants. Based in London since 2007, he has travelled the world seeking out the latest and best consumer technology for your enjoyment.

 

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