Least sexy iPad 3 part re-emerges in colors, with buttons

More alleged photos of the iPad 3's front glass have cropped up today, possibly putting to rest whether the device will nix the home button.

Possible iPad 3 parts, that don't look all that different from iPad 2 parts.
Possible iPad 3 parts, that don't look all that different from iPad 2 parts. Repair Labs

Was last week's smoldering imagery of the front glass panel allegedly belonging to Apple's iPad 3 not enough for you? Good news, there's more.

Gadget repair service Repair Labs today (via MacRumors) posts images of a pair of digitizers, the front panel that includes the glass and the touch sensitive layer it says belongs to the iPad 3. The images represent what look like a part that's further along than the one from last week , which appeared unfinished.

Besides the black and white color options, the big takeaway here is that the front of the device is just like the one on the iPad 2. The clear area for the camera is in the same spot, and the home button is still there (despite any indication otherwise ). Repair Labs notes that the one main difference is that the part is 1mm thicker and has a different connection cable than last year's model.

This is the latest in a series of possible leaked parts for Apple's next iPad, which is widely expected to be unveiled at Apple's special event next week . Other potential iPad 3 parts that have cropped up in recent weeks include a high pixel density display panel , rear aluminum backing, slightly modified home buttons, and a circuit board with an Apple-made "A5X" processor .

Repair Labs is the same repairs site that posted images of possible iPad 3 aluminum housing last month, a part that--for obvious reasons--remains unconfirmed. Below is a shot of the back of one of the parts, which includes the tweaked connector:

Back in black.
Back in black. Repair Labs
 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

iPhone running slow?

Here are some quick fixes for some of the most common problem in iOS 7.