Law makes tech easier for blind, disabled (podcast)

A soon-to-be law is designed to make tech more accessible to people with vision loss and other disabilities. CNET speaks with the American Foundation for the Blind.

The Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act, which President Obama is expected to sign on Friday, would make it easier for people who are visually impaired, deaf, or have other disabilities to access smartphones, TV programming, and other technology products. This would include making sure that devices could, when possible, be used by people who may not be able to see a screen.

The act is designed to assure that closed captioning, which is required on TV broadcasts, also applies to Web TV programming, and it would require that TV and Web-video interface devices, such as remote controls, be accessible.

Paul Schroeder, vice president, American Foundation for the Blind American Foundation for the Blind

To find out more about the law and the needs it addresses, I spoke with Paul Schroeder, vice president for programs and policy for the American Association for the Blind.


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