Kwaga's AddMe aims to inject useful life into e-mail signatures

A new service from a French startup lets people embed a link in e-mail so recipients can more easily add contact information to their address books.

Kwaga's AddMe service embeds a link in e-mails so recipients can more easily add contact information to their address books.
Kwaga's AddMe service embeds a link in e-mails so recipients can more easily add contact information to their address books. Kwaga

Expanding its technology for linking e-mail signature information and address books, startup Kwaga announced a new service that lets people turn those signatures into active information.

The Parisian company already offers a service called WriteThat.name that scours e-mails for contact information then copies it into Gmail, Notes, or Outlook address books. That's handy for people receiving e-mail, but now Kwaga added a new service called AddMe that's for people sending e-mail.

To use AddMe, people include a hyperlinked text that says "[+] Add me to your address book" in their signature blocks. When a recipient clicks on it, it takes them to a Web page showing the contact information and buttons that can be clicked to add the information to Gmail, Outlook, Apple Mail, and other services. It works with PCs as well as Android and iOS devices, Kwaga said.

AddMe costs $5 to set up, though it's free during the feature's launch period. For those using WriteThat.name, AddMe is included at no extra charge. WriteThat.name is free for a limited version that only adds up to 10 contacts, costs $35 a year for up to 300 contacts, and $60 a year for unlimited contacts.

 

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