Kodak's image-sensor spin-off gets a name: Truesense

The image-sensor division, now owned by Platinum Equity, picks up the brand name of some of its products.

Truesense Imaging logo

The image sensor group that beleaguered photography company Eastman Kodak sold last November has been named Truesense Imaging.

Platinum Equity, which bought the Kodak image-sensor group shortly before Kodak filed for bankruptcy protection , announced the new name yesterday.

Getting a name is a cosmetic detail, but it's an important one for a former business group trying to set up shop as a business. The company sells image sensors for industrial and professional applications such as high-end medium-format cameras and video equipment with high frame rates.

"As an independent company, we now have a great opportunity to expand our leadership position and to grow into new markets and new applications that leverage our core strengths in imaging technology," Chris McNiffe, Truesense's CEO and former general manager of Kodak's image-sensor business, said in a statement. "This is a very positive step forward for our business, our employees and, of course, our customers."

The Rochester, N.Y.-based company didn't look too far for a name. Kodak had come up with the Truesense brand for some of its newer image-sensor products .

Kodak has been struggling to adjust as digital imaging undermined its business . In an attempt to benefit from what assets it has, Kodak is suing Samsung, Apple, HTC, and Fujifilm for alleged patent infringement.

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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