Kaspersky CEO: You need an Internet 'passport'

Eugene Kaspersky, who runs Russian's No. 1 security software maker, describes how cybercrime should be quashed and why he supports the idea of an Internet "passport."

Eugene Kaspersky once told a competitor to his face: "I will eat you."

Eugene Kaspersky Kaspersky Lab

The co-founder and CEO of Kaspersky Lab was certainly not into cannibalism, but was hell-bent on winning over the majority market share his competitor had in the company's base in Russia.

That was in 1995, the year Windows 95 was launched. Contrary to Kaspersky's strategy to develop new software optimized for the Microsoft operating system, its domestic rival saw no need to do so. Today, Kaspersky has the pleasure of saying he had the last laugh since his company is now the market leader in Russia while its competitor has less than 1 percent share.

In Singapore this week for an Interpol conference and customer and media meetings, the 44-year-old Russian spoke candidly in an interview with ZDNet Asia about the security strategy of Microsoft, how cybercrime should be combated, and why an Internet "passport" would be a good idea.

Read more in a Q&A with Kaspersky at "Microsoft OneCare was 'good enough'" on ZDNet Asia.

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