Jobs' memorial filled with humor, music, report says

Bill Clinton, Bill Gates, and U2 front man Bono were among those in attendance for event to remember the late Apple co-founder.

The private memorial held for Steve Jobs was an intimate occasion full of tributes, music, and humor, a person who attended the service told The New York Times.

Friends, family, and colleagues gathered amid heavy security yesterday on Stanford University's campus to pay tribute to the late Apple co-founder.

Jobs' sister and noted writer Mona Simpson talked of being present during Jobs' last moments, and one of his daughters read from the script of an Apple TV commercial called "The Crazy Ones."

U2 front man Bono performed the Bob Dylan song "Every Grain of Sand," and Joan Baez sang "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot."

Longtime friend and Oracle CEO Larry Ellison recalled how he and Jobs would often take walks in the Silicon Valley foothills near their homes, the person who attended the service told the newspaper.

Other tech royalty in attendance were Apple CEO Tim Cook, whom Jobs picked as his replacement; Apple design guru Jonathan Ive; and iOS head Scott Forstall; as well former Apple employees Jonathan Rubinstein, Avie Tevanian, Tony Faddell, and Andy Hertzfeld. Former President Bill Clinton, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, and Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin were also in attendance.

Apple plans to hold a companywide celebration of the Apple co-founder's life on Wednesday morning at the company's Cupertino, Calif., headquarters.

Jobs, who died October 5 after a long battle with pancreatic cancer, was buried a few days later during a private, non-denominational funeral in Santa Clara County.

 

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