Jeter has sex change in Yankees Facebook page hack

Nefarious beings get into certain Major League Baseball teams' Facebook pages, in one case declaring that the Yankees' Derek Jeter will return in 2013 as Minnie Mantlez.

Screenshot: Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Hackers can be rather menacing sorts. They sometimes heave into places and cause painful havoc without compunction.

Sometimes, though, they try and reveal a deep and meaningful sense of humor.

That's not necessarily true in this particular case, but some hearty partisans might fleetingly think so. For several Major League Baseball team's Facebook pages were briefly broken into today and messages were posted that, at least, Mashable describes as "inappropriate."

Here at Technically Incorrect, we prefer to let people judge for themselves.

So here is what was reportedly posted on the Yankees' Facebook page:

We regret to inform our fans that Derek Jeter will miss the rest of the season with sexual reassignment surgery. He promises to come back stronger than ever in 2013 as Minnie Mantlez.

The Facebook page of my own deeply beloved San Francisco Giants was reportedly adorned with a topical haiku: "Wow, the Chick-fil-A guy sure is an asshole."

Fans of the Miami Marlins', struggling as they are (the fans and the team), were offered "a free rescued fighting pit bull courtesy of the Dade County Animal Rescue League." This offer was reportedly restricted to those 18 and under -- the "humor" there being that pit pulls are banned in Miami-Dade County.

The Miami Herald received this statement from MLB Advanced Media: "For a brief moment today, a few MLB Club Facebook accounts were hacked and inappropriate material was briefly on display from those Clubs' pages on Facebook."

The statement, though, offered an ominous portent for those who breached the MLB's digital infield: "We are working with Facebook, Major League Baseball Security and, where appropriate, legal authorities to determine the circumstances surrounding this situation."

That's the thing with "inappropriate" words. Sometimes the powerful think legal action is "appropriate."

Currently, no one has claimed responsibility for this activity, though one wonders just how safely protected these pages were.

Stephen Colbert, for his part, couldn't resist commenting on the appropriateness of the hack. In a tweet this evening, he mused: "The Yankees' Facebook page was hacked. The hacker was immediately purchased and signed to a five-year contract with the Yankees."

The Facebook pages of the Braves, the Angels, the Cubs and the White Sox also underwent tampering, with an equal, bleacher-level pitch of humor.

Some might wonder, though, that jokes about the Yankees always seem slightly more, well, appropriate than jokes about any other team. Even when they're not funny.

 

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