Jabber creator signs on to Wikia search project

Folks behind public encyclopedia Wikipedia enlist Jeremie Miller to help with Wikia project focused on open-source search tools.

Jabber founder Jeremie Miller has signed on to help develop Wikia's open-source search engine project, the organization announced.

The Wikia project aims to develop a search engine, crawlers and other indexing tools through a collaborative, open-source process.

"Jeremie is a brilliant thinker and a natural fit to help revolutionize the world of search," Wikipedia and Wikia co-founder Jimmy Wales said in a statement. "I believe Internet search is currently broken, and the way to fix it is to build a community whose mission is to develop a search platform that is open and totally transparent."

Contributors will likely include graduate students, as well large companies that want to include search functionality in their products but don't want to pay royalties to a search company, according to Wikia CEO Gil Penchina. Another constituency will likely be smaller search companies that don't have the time or money to do everything required for a complete search service themselves.

"Everyone has to crawl the Web, but it costs a lot of money," Penchina said. "There has been a lot of interest in academia for better tools."

The ultimate goal of the project is to bring "absolute transparency, collaboration and human intelligence to complement search algorithms," according to a press release.

Not mentioned in the press release is the fact that Wikia is a for-profit venture. The complete business plan has yet to be worked out, but profits and revenue may be derived from advertising or services, Penchina said. The intellectual property behind Wikia, however, will be freely licensed under standard open-source mechanisms.

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