iTunes 7.4 kills ringtones from third-party tools (iToner, etc.)

iTunes 7.4 kills ringtones from third-party tools (iToner, etc.)

Earlier today we noted the release of iTunes 7.4, which among other enhancements, includes the previously announced ringtone maker for the iPhone.

The service â?? built into the iTunes application â?? will allow users to customize tracks currently for sale through the iTunes store, selecting the portion they want, perform fades and other sound editing. After the track has been cut and edited as desired, the 'Buy' button is pressed, and the tone is automatically transferred to the iPhone. Pricing is as follows: You purchase the track for $.99, then pay $.99 to turn it into a ringtone, for a total purchase price of $1.98.

Unfortunately, iTunes 7.4 also interferes with third-party tools for adding ringtones to the iPhone, including Ambrosia Software's iToner. iTunes will wipe out any custom ringtones transferred with the tool and others, even if the option to sync ringtones is not selected. It will also wipe custom ringtones for contacts.

In a posting to a mailing list, Ambrosia Software President Andrew Welch describes what is happening, and promises as fix:

"When iTunes 7.4 syncs, it takes a file that is in its database, and it blows away the file that is on your iPhone with it. That file contains a list of the user-installed ringtones. Since iTunes thinks it's the only want that will be adding ringtones, it assumes that it has the complete file, and just overwrites the file on your iPhone. The ringtones are actually still there, but the iPhone doesn't know about them because the "index" file gets blown away by iTunes. The good news is, we think we can fix it. Stay tuned."

Feedback? info@iphoneatlas.com.

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